TekyGo! Stimulates Educational Conversations Between Children and Their Parents

TekyGo! Stimulates Educational Conversations Between Children and Their Parents

TekyGo! Stimulates Educational Conversations Between Children and Their Parents

‘So many games to choose from!’, those were my 6-year-old son Tyler’s exact words when he turned on TekyGo! Portal. He was so excited to try out all the new games. Some of Tyler’s favorites are Teky & Friends World Explorer, where the character you choose can hop their way around the world while doing some sightseeing and learning interesting facts about each country. Then there’s Bounce Frenzy, where you compete against the computer to race on a water course, then hop to see whether you or the computer will pop the giant balloon first, and then race to chop down a tree, just in time to bring to home for Christmas!

However, Tyler’s absolute favourite is Ant in the Plant! When we first started the game, we weren’t sure why we saw waterdrops stuck in the ground. That didn’t really bother Tyler though, because as he hopped he was helping the ant dig a tunnel through the ground to find hidden fossils. The faster he hopped the faster the ant dug. And each time he reached his goal he was awarded with a very cool dinosaur fossil. But the ultimate feature that both Tyler and I liked was at the end when the tunnel was finished, all the waterdrops raised up to the surface to water the plants that were above ground, and they grew!! What a great educational component to be included in this game!

According to recent research on educational exergaming, learning-by-creating-educational-exergames approach can be successfully implemented in classroom teaching. It can make the school day physically more active, and it seems to engage and motivate students significantly.[i] In fact, the teachers that were involved in this research project actually requested more game elements that facilitate curriculum-based teaching, and students asked for more options to be included so they could create different types of games.[ii]

Learning through play has been the foundation of any Early Childhood Curriculum. What I love about the people at TekyGo! is their desire to not only create opportunities for children to play, but to also learn at the same time. A prime example of this is the game I just described, Ant in the Plant. This game not only allows children to hop and get their physical exercise, but to also stimulate conversation between parents and children about how plants need water, soil, air and energy to grow. This information is part of what children will learn in the Ontario Science and Technology elementary curriculum. They learn about needs and characteristics of living things in Grade 1, growth and changes in plants in Grade 3, as well as air, water soil in the environment in Grades 2 and 3.[iii] TekyGo! has made this information easy to understand for preschoolers by having this fun and exciting game, and parents can discuss what is happening on the screen when the child reaches his/her goal.

I can’t wait to continue to work with TekyGo! to see what they will come up with next! In the meantime, enjoy their educational exergames and let’s get kids moving! 3, 2, 1, TekyGO!

 

 

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[1]  Killi, K, Tuomi, P, Koskela, M., & Earp, J. (2014). Learning by Creating Educational Exergames. Finnish Innovations and Technologies in Schools (pp.87-96).

[1] Killi, K, Tuomi, P, Koskela, M., & Earp, J. (2014). Learning by Creating Educational Exergames. Finnish Innovations and Technologies in Schools (pp.87-96).

[1] Ontario. (2007). The Ontario curriculum, Science and Technology, grades 1-8. Toronto: Ontario, Ministry of Education.

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