66% of Children Do Not Achieve Acceptable Physical Literacy Skills

66% of Children Do Not Achieve Acceptable Physical Literacy Skills

66% of Children Do Not Achieve Acceptable Physical Literacy Skills

TekyGo! is a top gaming tool used by parents to promote physical activity.

Recent research has shown that 2/3 of Canadian children have not achieved an acceptable level of physical literacy.[i] So what is physical literacy?  Physical literacy can be defined as “the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge and understanding to value and take responsibility for engagement and physical activities”.[ii]

TekyGo! provides the opportunity for children to learn these fundamental movement skills by encouraging them to learn and practice jumping, hopping, and balancing on a vertical and horizontal axis. This is achieved through the use of interactive, fun, challenging and educational games that the kids love playing.

 

 

In my last blog I discussed when children should start focusing on a specific sport and I shared that children need to develop their fundamental movement skills first. Children between the age of 2 to 6 should be exposed to a wide variety of different movement skills and patterns in order to develop these fundamental movement skills.

The Royal Bank of Canada learn to play - Canadian assessment of physical literacy project looked at 10,034 children aged 8 to 12 across Canada over three years and discovered that only one-third of these children meet what is thought to be a basic level of physical literacy.[iii]

What this means is that children need more opportunities to learn to throw, catch, kick, jump, hop, balance, etc. Educators and parents need to teach and provide different types of activities to allow the children to experience these movement skills while having fun and being challenged cognitively, physically, and emotionally.

As mentioned in the last blog, children do not develop fundamental movement skills on their own, they need to learn the skills and have many different opportunities to practice. The ability to apply the same skill in different contexts/situations is crucial, and TekyGo! games provide different types of challenges and scenarios to keep children motivated to do just that.

 

So let’s get playing so children can move and learn! 3,2,1, TekyGo! To learn more on the TekyGo! Accessories that can help build their fundamental skills, click here.

 

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[i] Tremblay, Mark S., et al. "Physical literacy levels of Canadian children aged 8-12 years: descriptive and normative results from the RBC Learn to Play-CAPL project." BMC Public Health, vol. 18, no. Suppl 2, 2 Oct. 2018. Gale Academic OneFile, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A556713874/AONE?u=king56371&sid=bookmark-AONE&xid=fca2a613. Accessed 22 Sept. 2021.

[ii] Whitehead, M. (2013). What is physical literacy and how does it impact on physical education. Debates in physical education, 37-52.

[iii] Tremblay, Mark S., et al. "Physical literacy levels of Canadian children aged 8-12 years: descriptive and normative results from the RBC Learn to Play-CAPL project." BMC Public Health, vol. 18, no. Suppl 2, 2 Oct. 2018. Gale Academic OneFile, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A556713874/AONE?u=king56371&sid=bookmark-AONE&xid=fca2a613. Accessed 22 Sept. 2021.

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